Advance your international research skills by working on engaging research at New Zealand’s highest-ranked university, the University of Auckland. Geared towards arts and humanities students who are considering graduate studies, respected researchers lead the projects studying the complicated intersectionality of topics involving cultural heritage and identity, gender, politics and more. Each project is unique, offering a mix of in-class and field research, individual and group responsibilities. Outside of class, explore more of this fascinating region, from the multicultural city center to the rugged natural environments all around. You’ll also get to know Kiwi culture better through an organized orientation, cultural events, and TEAN support.

Overview

Study at New Zealand’s top-ranked university, the University of Auckland, located in the heart of the city

Gain critical research skills in humanities-based subjects and earn credit while working with academics from the university’s Faculty of Arts

Experience living in Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, with its magnificent coastline stretching both to the east and west

Appreciate access to TEAN’s Auckland-based Resident Director and other in-country TEAN staff for continued support throughout the summer

Take advantage of the included 4-day Orientation Program traveling to some of the North Island’s most unique spots and setting you up for a successful summer abroad

Program Details

Orientation Excursion

Get ready for an exhilarating crash course in Kiwi living, plus a semester orientation with fellow TEAN students. Explore New Zealand’s rich culture and environments starting in Auckland with a traditional Maori welcome ceremony and hangi dinner at a marae (meeting house). Next, stop at Hobbiton, then discover Rotorua’s renowned geothermal activity (including the Wai-o-tapu Thermal Wonderland), soak in natural hot springs, learn a powerful Maori haka, and more. After this packed four program, you’ll feel confident navigating all things Kiwi with a strong foundation on which to build your semester.

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Housing

Live in the center of Auckland in apartment-style student accommodation near campus. The apartments come with a private bedroom plus a shared bathroom, kitchen and living spaces.


TEAN Staff

Our team works with you from start to finish throughout the study abroad process. Our programs staff will help guide you through the application process to go abroad, then upon arrival in New Zealand, you will meet our team who will provide assistance during your time in-country. Throughout your semester, you will meet with the Auckland Resident Director for informal discussions and excursions. Our staff is readily available and able to assist you with any academic, social, or cultural questions or issues that you may face during your time abroad.

Meet the Team

Cultural Activities

Even though you are traveling abroad to study, it’s important to take time to enjoy the local culture. This program includes a minimum of three unique and engaging cultural activities, such as concerts or sports events, during your time in New Zealand. Past events have included; touring Waiheke Island with a Maori guide, going to a rugby match, and whale watching along the coast, in addition to coffee catch ups with the TEAN staff.

2021 Remote Option

Summer 2021 Remote Option

Explore the world from home this summer with our new remote summer undergraduate research program. Research projects are conducted through the University of Auckland and facilitated by host university professors. Research supervisors will review student applications for their project and then rank the applications they are willing to accept. A Skype interview with applicants may be arranged to determine placement. Students enroll in one research course (15 Auckland credits), which usually transfers as 4 U.S. credits.

Students will meet with their research supervisor and other students working on the project regularly throughout the six-to-eight-week program. Examples of work students can expect includes archival work, gathering and reviewing historical documents, writing bibliographies, summarizing material, and conducting interviews. The research supervisor and the student will create a detailed work plan at the start of the program to discuss what the student will need to achieve during the research period to receive credit.


Dates, Fees & Inclusions

Application Deadline April 15
Program Starts June 21
Program Ends* Aug 2 Aug 16

*This program has a flexible duration of six to eight weeks

Tuition and program fees: $2,995

What’s Included
  • Full tuition (15 points from the University of Auckland)
  • Cultural events with TEAN
  • University and project selection advice
  • Official academic transcript from the University of Auckland
  • Academic advising
  • A truly one-of-a-kind adventure!
What’s Not Included

You will be responsible for ensuring you have what you need to study and complete the research remotely, such as a computer and reliable internet.

2021 Remote Research Projects

2021 Remote Research Projects

Students enroll in one research course (15 Auckland credits), which usually transfers as 4 U.S. credits.

Superfluous Injury, Unnecessary Suffering and the Regulation of War

The principles of superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering are key components of international humanitarian law. They have been invoked to ban expanding bullets, asphyxiating gases, blinding lasers, landmines, and cluster munitions. At the same time, renowned legal expert Antonio Cassese argued that these principles are “two of the most unclear and controversial rules of warfare…couched in such vague and uncertain terms as to be barren of practical results.” This project will consist of two parts—the first examines how these concepts were successfully invoked to ban biological agents, blinding lasers, landmines, and cluster munitions. The second part examines how these concepts were unsuccessfully invoked by national liberation movements to draw attention to suffering and injury beyond the physical harm.

Citizenship, Impermanent Residency and the Politics of Populations on the Move

The world currently faces a human migration policy crisis—in 2019, there were more than 25 million refugees displaced around the world. Tens of millions of others reside on temporary visas in a country other than that of their birth. Considerable attention has been paid to immigration policy issues in Europe, North America, and Australia, while significantly less attention has focused on the Pacific region. This project seeks to address this gap.

The Practice of Involuntary Civil Commitment of Individuals with Mental Illness; A Pacific Perspective

This project will serve as the foundation to a planned edited volume that seeks to add to the global literature on mental health policies and practices with a focus on involuntary (civil) commitment practices and procedures for individuals with acute mental health conditions. The central goal is to illuminate incongruities between indigenous practices for acute mental health conditions and codified policy preferences and procedures for state-imposed custody and treatment regimes.

“Mother of the ERA”: A Political Biography of Martha W. Griffiths

This project is the first biographical study in nearly 40 years of the political career of Representative Martha W. Griffiths (1912-2003), who was also a feminist and a member of the National Woman’s Party during the so-called “doldrums” of the modern women’s movement. Over the course of her career, she contributed to reform in many areas, but most consistently Martha focused on eradicating gender inequalities from legislation in the 1960s and 1970s. She fought for the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), guiding its passage through Congress in 1973. The student researcher will carry out historical primary research with two different types of sources: first, to examine the key events in the political career of Representative Martha Griffiths and the political and public reception and impact; second, to gather government documents, particularly from the Congressional record, in which Griffiths features as either chair or speaker.

Mapping Innovations in Indigenous, Feminist, and Culturally Appropriate Research Methodologies

There has been a recent explosion of different Pacific research paradigms and methodologies developed. We can recognize that this work builds on previous innovations in indigenous methodologies more broadly and/or germinal work by intersectional feminist and minoritized community researchers, but these links are not well known. Students will help contribute to mapping these innovations, their connections, and their links to more recent work in Pacific methodologies.

Ngā Taonga o Wharawhara / The World of Māori Body Adornment: Understanding Adornment in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Worlds – A Literature Review

This project aims to produce new research on Māori body adornment to the present day. The project promotes the idea of a continuum of practice of Māori artists in relation to the use of materials, the changing technologies, and the ways in which adornment has been and continues to be integrated into the social, political, economic, and cultural landscape of whānau, hapū, and iwi.

Researching the University of Auckland Art Collection

Since 1966, the University of Auckland has built and maintained an art collection which reflects significant developments in New Zealand art from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. This is a project designed to document that collection in a book to be published by Auckland University Press that will be organized thematically dealing with the different aspects of the collection including Cubism, Expressionism, and the expatriates; Māori motifs and modernism; Figurative, Colour Field, and Gestural Abstraction; Māori and Pasifika artists; new generation diasporic artists; women artists and feminism; contemporary photography; postmodernist appropriations; and new methods and media.

Censorship in Italian Cinema

This research project looks at issues of censorship with a specific focus on a recent film by Irene Dionisio. Dionisio has retrieved “prohibited” clips of major Italian films from the 1950s-1990s and reassembled them in her film. Her work, in addition to being an act of recovery and a reimagining of film fragments, draws on our attention to the impact of the censor’s cuts on the original films, addresses the issues of censorship in Italian cinema, and issues of censorship and creativity more broadly.

University

About the University of Auckland

  • Founded in 1883, the University of Auckland is the country’s largest university with more than 40,000 students.
  • Ranked in the top 100 universities in the world, and number one in New Zealand by the QS World University Rankings.
  • The University of Auckland is ranked in top 50 schools in the world for: Civil engineering, Education, Psychology and Literature (QS World University Rankings).
  • The Business School holds leading international accreditations including the “triple crown”: AACSB International (United States), EQUIS (Europe) and AMBA (United Kingdom), and is ranked in the top 100 schools in the world (QS World University Rankings).
  • The University of Auckland is located in New Zealand’s largest city and commercial center. The city is an eclectic mix of New Zealand, Asian and South Pacific cultures. The University of Auckland’s main campus is bordered by two city parks and is adjacent to the bustling city center, which provides convenient access to shops, entertainment venues and museums. The city’s pace and energy spill onto Auckland’s campus, where historically significant buildings and landmarks meet modern architecture and state-of-the-art research facilities.

Location

University of Auckland is located in the city center of Auckland. Visit the google map link below to see the campus location.

View Map 

Research Projects

Research Projects

Research projects are conducted through the University of Auckland and facilitated by host university professors. Research supervisors will review student applications for their project and then rank the applications they are willing to accept. A Skype interview with applicants may be arranged as well to determine placement.  Students enroll in one research course (15 Auckland credits), which usually transfers as 4 U.S. credits.

Develop multidimensional research skills as you contribute to research projects that tackle complex, global issues, such as:

  • Gender stereotypes in politics and news framing
  • Political marketing in the U.S. and New Zealand
  • Citizenship, refugee resettlement, and impermanent residency
  • Gender violence and contemporary crime narratives
  • Colonial empires and decolonization
  • Maori identity and research methodologies
  • Sports, indigenous identity, and cultural appropriation
  • Censorship, history, and cultural heritage

Below are some examples of recent projects. Please note that projects change regularly.

Ngā Taonga o Wharawhara / Māori Body Adornment

This project aims to produce new research on Māori body adornment to the present day. The project promotes the idea of a continuum of practice of Māori artists in relation to the use of materials, the changing technologies, and the ways in which adornment has been and continues to be integrated into the social, political, economic, and cultural landscape of whānau, hapū, and iwi.

Contested Urban Futures: an ethnography of future-making in Christchurch

This project investigates how Christchurch citizens imagine and narrate their hopes, fears, and expectations for the future of their city. Using interviews and ethnographic methods (including video ethnography), it gives voice to a diverse range of people with multiple and often conflicting perspectives, including citizens as well as stakeholders and activists involved in rebuilding and transforming Christchurch.

Political Marketing in the U.S. and New Zealand: Donald Trump 2016-2020

This project looks at the effectiveness of political marketing in government by U.S. President Donald Trump (2016-2020) and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern (2017-2020), analyzing the two cases against two key theories: the Market-Sales-Product Oriented Party Models and Contemporary Governing Leaders’ Communication Model. Students collect primary and secondary sources, such as Presidential/Prime Ministerial documents, policies, speeches and websites, public opinion data, social media, and media reports. They then analyze how the political leaders use of political marketing meets the theory. This work will be used in teaching, commentary, and potential publications on the New Zealand 2020 election and U.S. 2020 election.

Citizenship, Impermanent Residency, and the Politics of Populations on the Move

The world currently faces a human migration policy crisis. In 2019 there were more than 25 million refugees displaced around the world. Tens of millions of others reside on temporary visas in a country other than that of their birth. Considerable attention has been paid to immigration policy issues in Europe, North America, and Australia, while significantly less attention has focused on the Pacific region. This project seeks to address this gap.

Mapping Innovations in Indigenous, Feminist, and Culturally Appropriate Research Methodologies

There has been a recent explosion of different Pacific research paradigms and methodologies developed. We can recognize that this work builds on previous innovations in indigenous methodologies more broadly and/or germinal work by intersectional feminist and minoritized community researchers but these links are not well known. Students will help contribute to mapping these innovations, their connections, and their links to more recent work in Pacific methodologies.

Eligibility

Eligibility

  • 3.2 GPA
  • Two years of undergraduate experience
  • Background that reflects research topic is preferred but not required

Dates, Fees & Inclusions

Application Deadline

TEAN has a rolling admissions process. We recommend submitting your application anytime from January for Summer applications. Earlier applications will be accepted. Late applications may be considered. Contact TEAN if the application deadline has passed.


Summer 2022

Application Deadline March 1
Arrival Date Mid-June
Program Ends Early Aug

*These dates are tentative. Final dates will be released closer to departure.


2022 Program Fees

Estimated tuition, program fees and housing – $7,550


What’s Included

  • Tuition for 1 research course at the University of Auckland
  • Guaranteed, pre-arranged housing including internet
  • Bedding pack
  • Comprehensive health insurance
  • Services of local TEAN support staff throughout the program
  • 4-Day North Island Orientation Excursion with some meals, excursions, accommodations, and transportation
  • Cultural events and catch ups during the program
  • Access to a pre-arranged flight itinerary and booking agent
  • Extensive pre-departure advising
  • Official academic transcript from host institution
  • Credit approval and transfer assistance
  • Help with visa preparation
  • Financial aid transfer planning
  • Airport pickup and reception upon arrival at TEAN Orientation
  • Farewell dinner at conclusion of program

What’s not Included

  • International airfare ($1,200-1,800)
  • Domestic airfare in the U.S. ($500)
  • Meals during the summer ($1,000)
  • Travel insurance ($350)
  • New Zealand visa ($35)

Scholarships

TEAN Scholarships

Apply for TEAN scholarships – starting at $1,000 – for the chance to receive money specifically for studying abroad. Each year we award thousands of dollars in need- and merit-based scholarships, diversity scholarships, a full ride scholarship and more. Visit our scholarships page for details!

We Love Auckland

Rachel Fenton

Resident Director - New Zealand

Auckland Tip
Albert Park

Albert Park, next to the University of Auckland, is an awesome study spot during the summer when the weather is great. You can work on a tan while you get work done! In the winter it’s hard to beat one of the quaint cafes on High Street or, for a slightly quirkier twist, K Road cafes such as Verona, where you can warm up with a fantastic coffee or hot chocolate while you get your work done.

Kate Hilby

Senior Program Manager

Auckland Tip
K-Road

For cheap eats the K Road kebab shops in Auckland offer some awesome Mediterranean food for around the NZ$10-$15 mark. For something a bit more adventurous, Korean BBQ and Chinese restaurants along Upper Queen Street are a sure way to feed the beast while maximizing bang for your buck.

Q&A

Tell us a little about what you do at TEAN?
I currently work on our New Zealand, Fiji, Japan and Southeast Asia programs. My role as team lead and Program Manager is to make sure everything on these programs is running smoothly working with our team. It includes everything from making sure students have pre-departure information on time to making sure they submit all of the items they need to study abroad (i.e. transcripts, courses, contracts, arrival details, payments, visa confirmations).

Where did you study abroad?
I studied with TEAN in Melbourne, Australia at Deakin University. It’s a more traditional campus, just outside the city but being able to live in the city and commute gave me the best of both worlds. Honestly, Melbourne has something for everyone – think sporting events, art, music, theatre, comedy, laneway cafes/restaurants/bars, shopping, the list goes on. Melbourne is consistently ranked as one of the world’s most liveable cities, so why wouldn’t you choose to study there? If you’re looking for a Melbourne equivalent in New Zealand, check out Wellington known as the coolest little capital in the world. It’s a smaller city, but that makes it an easy city to get around by foot. It’s a very accessible city for study abroad students.

What brought you back to Melbourne to live and work after graduation?
When I graduated, I knew I wanted to return to Australia. My time studying abroad had given me that exposure to living abroad and I wanted to spend more time there as a professional. For my career, It was great to gain work experience at a university abroad. I’m so glad I went down this path or I might not have ended up at TEAN today!

Packing for study abroad is always a challenge and popular topic, as a frequent flyer – what insider tips do you have for someone packing for the semester?
I’ve become pretty good at packing light over the years since there have been so many times earlier on where I’ve overpacked. I took half of my closet and never touched the majority of it. You will hear the advice – pack everything you think you’ll need then take half of it – and it’s so true. My other advice is to pack articles of clothing you can mix and match to create different outfits to help reduce items. Also try to keep the shoe situation under control, they take up a lot of room. Bring a couple pairs that are super versatile (and comfortable).

If you were going to study abroad tomorrow on a TEAN program where would you go?
I’m biased, but I would study on one of our New Zealand programs. Since working with our TEAN New Zealand students, I’ve had the opportunity to travel to New Zealand several times and have visited all program locations. I also recently lived in New Zealand for a year based out of Auckland. I love the idea of going for a semester, joining a tramping club on campus and getting out into the beauty of New Zealand in my free time!

From the Blog

@TEANabroad